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Bartramia longicauda)

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This is a long-legged plover, the size of which ranges from 27 to 32 centimeters. Body weight does not exceed 140-200 grams. The bird’s neck is thin and long. The head is small, round in shape. The beak is short, thin. The tail is long, it is clearly visible with the wings folded, where the name comes from.

Long-tailed sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda).

The legs are yellow-gray, the rump is black, the eyes are dark, the beak is yellow, and its tip is dark. There are dark stripes on the tail. The wings in the upper part are dark, and the underwings are brown. The head is pale, the throat is whitish. In adults, a dark cap is located on the head. The back is brown, and the stomach and chest are white with a V-shaped dark speck. Females and males have almost the same color. The plumage of winter in long-tailed sandboxes is slightly paler, compared to summer.

The colors of the chickens are black, yellow, white and brown. From the beak to the crown of the head passes a black strip. The lower body and chin are white. Young birds have a very pale head, and no cap on it. The upper body is darker, the neck is yellowish.

The bird is named after the American naturalist William Bartram.

See also in other dictionaries:

Bartramia longicauda - Bartramie des champs Bartramia longicauda ... Wikipédia en Français

Bartramia longicauda - Plover Plov er, n. OF. plovier, F. pluvier, prop., the rain bird, fr. LL. (assumed) pluviarius, fr. L. pluvia rain, from pluere to rain, akin to E. float, G. fliessen to flow. See . 1. (Zo ol.) Any one of the numerous species of limicoline ... The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Bartramia longicauda - Upland Up land, a. 1. Of or pertaining to uplands, being on upland, high in situation, as, upland inhabitants, upland pasturage. 1913 Webster Sometimes, with secure delight The upland hamlets will invite. Milton. 1913 Webster 2. Pertaining to ... The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Bartramia longicauda - Field Field (f = eld), n. OE. feld, fild, AS. feld, akin to D. veld, G. feld, Sw. f alt, Dan. felt, Icel. fold field of grass, AS. folde earth, land, ground, OS. folda. 1. Cleared land, land suitable for tillage or pasture, cultivated ground, ... The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Bartramia longicauda - bartramija statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas atitikmenys: lot. Bartramia longicauda angl. upland sandpiper vok. Prärieläufer, m. Rus. bartramia, f, long-tailed sandpiper, m pranc. maubèche des champs, f ryšiai: platesnis terminas - ... ... Paukščių pavadinimų žodynas

Bartramia longicauda - noun large plover like sandpiper of North American fields and uplands • Syn: ↑ upland sandpiper, ↑ upland plover, ↑ Bartramian sandpiper • Hypernyms: ↑ sandpiper • Member Holonyms: ↑ Bartramia, ↑ ... Useful english dictionary

Bartramia - Bartramie des champs Bartramia longicauda ... Wikipédia en Français

Bartramia - noun a genus of Scolopac> Useful english dictionary

genus bartramia - noun a genus of Scolopac> Useful english dictionary

Maubèche des champs - Pour les articles homonymes, voir Bartramia (homonymie). Maubèche des champs ... Wikipédia en Français

Bartramie des champs - Bartramia longicauda ... Wikipédia en Français

Prärieläufer - (Bartramia longicauda) Systematik Ordnung: Regenpfeiferartige (Charadriiformes) Familie ... Deutsch Wikipedia

Upland sandpiper - Taxobox name = Upland Sandpiper status = LC | status system = IUCN3.1 image w> Wikipedia

upland plover - noun large plover like sandpiper of North American fields and uplands • Syn: ↑ upland sandpiper, ↑ Bartramian sandpiper, ↑ Bartramia longicauda • Hypernyms: ↑ sandpiper • Member Holonyms: ↑ Bartramia, ↑ ... Useful english dictionary

Bartramia - Bartramia ... Wikipedia

List of birds of brazil - Brazil has one of the richest bird diversities in the world, with more than 1700 species of birds, about 57% of the bird species recorded for all of South America. These numbers are still increasing, almost every year, due to new occurrences or ... ... Wikipedia

Reférences externes

  • Référence Alan P. Peterson: Bartramia longicauda dans Ciconiiformes (en)
  • Référence Avibase: Bartramia longicauda(+ répartition) (fr + en)
  • Référence Oiseaux.net: Bartramia longicauda(+ répartition) (fr)
  • Référence ITIS: Bartramia longicauda (Bechstein, 1812) (fr) ( + version (en))
  • Référence Animal Diversity Web: Bartramia longicauda (en)
  • Référence NCBI: Bartramia longicauda (en)
  • Référence IUCN: espèceBartramia longicauda (Bechstein, 1812) (en)
  • Portail de l’ornithologie

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Regardez d'autres dictionnaires:

Bartramia longicauda - Plover Plov er, n. OF. plovier, F. pluvier, prop., the rain bird, fr. LL. (assumed) pluviarius, fr. L. pluvia rain, from pluere to rain, akin to E. float, G. fliessen to flow. See . 1. (Zo ol.) Any one of the numerous species of limicoline ... The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Bartramia longicauda - Upland Up land, a. 1. Of or pertaining to uplands, being on upland, high in situation, as, upland inhabitants, upland pasturage. 1913 Webster Sometimes, with secure delight The upland hamlets will invite. Milton. 1913 Webster 2. Pertaining to ... The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Bartramia longicauda - Field Field (f = eld), n. OE. feld, fild, AS. feld, akin to D. veld, G. feld, Sw. f alt, Dan. felt, Icel. fold field of grass, AS. folde earth, land, ground, OS. folda. 1. Cleared land, land suitable for tillage or pasture, cultivated ground, ... The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Bartramia longicauda - bartramija statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas atitikmenys: lot. Bartramia longicauda angl. upland sandpiper vok. Prärieläufer, m. Rus. bartramia, f, long-tailed sandpiper, m pranc. maubèche des champs, f ryšiai: platesnis terminas - ... ... Paukščių pavadinimų žodynas

Bartramia longicauda - noun large plover like sandpiper of North American fields and uplands • Syn: ↑ upland sandpiper, ↑ upland plover, ↑ Bartramian sandpiper • Hypernyms: ↑ sandpiper • Member Holonyms: ↑ Bartramia, ↑ ... Useful english dictionary

Bartramia - Bartramie des champs Bartramia longicauda ... Wikipédia en Français

Bartramia - noun a genus of Scolopac> Useful english dictionary

genus bartramia - noun a genus of Scolopac> Useful english dictionary

Maubèche des champs - Pour les articles homonymes, voir Bartramia (homonymie). Maubèche des champs ... Wikipédia en Français

Bartramie des champs - Bartramia longicauda ... Wikipédia en Français

Long-Tailed Sandbox Behavior

These birds live in family groups throughout the year, and in the breeding season they form pairs. One family group lives on a plot with a diameter of up to 3.2 square kilometers. Their habitat is grassy areas with low vegetation - meadows, fields, pastures and prairies, on which bluegrass, feather grass, timothy grass and wheatgrass grow. In February, they begin to fly north.

Often you can see a sandbox sitting on fences, poles and stumps. On the ground they move, making short dashes, while shaking their heads.

When the sandstone notices food, he stops abruptly and picks it up. Long-tailed sandstones find their livelihood with the help of keen eyesight; they do not dig in the sand and mud, as other sandpipers do.

Sandboxes are mostly insectivorous birds. Their diet consists of earthworms, grasshoppers, beetles, flies, spiders, millipedes, ants and insect larvae. Also, a small part of the diet consists of grains and seeds of herbs and weeds.

In the breeding season, long-tailed sandboxes sing songs that resemble a whistle, such as vit-vii-ii-yu, its tone changes. This whistle is carried over long distances.

Adult color in adolescents appears after the first molt.

Long-tailed sandboxes' natural enemies are raccoon stripes, coyotes, badgers, striped skunks, American minks, Cooper hawks, striped hawks, golden eagles, polar owls, American kestrels, cats and domestic dogs. Among other things, people prey on them. Sandboxes also suffer from the fact that their nests are often trampled on the pasture by domestic ungulates. The life span of these birds is approximately 5 years.

Reproduction of Long-Tailed Sandboxes

The breeding season of long-tailed sandbirds is observed at the beginning of May - in July. At nesting sites, sandboxes appear in late April or May. After 2-3 weeks, they begin to build nests. In season, long-tailed sandboxes make one clutch.

They nest in colonies. At a distance of 0.6 to 6 hectares, there may be one nest. On such a site there is a territory for feeding and rest.

Bartramia nests in low-grass meadows, on prairies, and on grassy swamps.

During courtship, the male flies in large circles behind the female and sings songs. When the birds fall to the ground, the male raises its tail and approaches its partner, while making a guttural whistle.

Long-tailed sandboxes prefer to make nests in tall grass in open fields, prairies, meadows and among marshes. The nest looks like a small hole, the depth of which is 5-7.5 centimeters, and the diameter is 10-13 centimeters. The bottom of the nest is insulated with leaves, grass and twigs. The nest is imperceptible, since it is located among grass 15-40 centimeters high, which hangs on top of it.

The female lays 3-4 eggs of a greenish-yellow or pale olive color with gray or brown dots. When the enemy approaches the nest, the birds begin to scream loudly to divert attention to themselves.

Parents actively protect their babies. Both parents hatch eggs. Incubation lasts 21-28 days. Chicks are furry and long-legged, like their parents. At 2 days old they are already selected from the nest and accompany their parents. They acquire full plumage at the age of one month. At about 30 days, young individuals already have the same weight as adults. Puberty in long-tailed sandboxes occurs about a year.

Most of the prey is collected on the surface of the earth.

Long-tailed sandpop population

People actively hunt these birds. Although the area of ​​the range of long-tailed sandbirds is 2.5 million square kilometers, the species is gradually decreasing. However, at the moment, the population is not a concern.

The main reason for the reduction in the number of long-tailed sandboxes: hunting, destruction of habitats, the use of pesticides in agriculture and forest fires.

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Description

Adults are approximately 30 cm (12 inches) long with 66 cm (26 inches) wingspan. Average weight 170 g (6 ounces). This strange bird has a small pigeon head on a long neck. She is heavily marbled black and brown on her back and wings. The neck is veined dark brown, which continues down to the chest and on the flanks. Belly and tail coverts are white. The tail is quite long for a sandpiper. The hill is also athletic with a white eye ring and long yellow legs.

Spectrum

They breed from eastern Alaska southeast of the Rockies through Montana to northern Oklahoma, and then to northeast Pennsylvania, New England and the extreme southern provinces of Quebec and Ontario. There are also local breeding populations in northeast Oregon and central western Idaho. They winter in the northeast of Argentina, Uruguay and southern Brazil. This is an extremely rare tramp in the South Pacific, with one entry from each of Australia and New Zealand.

Habitat

Although they are waders, they prefer an open area with tall grasses in the coastal habitat. They are also located at airports, blueberry farms and abandoned quarries in the east. Their true core range and habitat is in the northern Midwest of the United States.

Behavior and diet

Bartramia feed in the fields, picking up food vision. They are often seen on poles and even telephone poles. When Uppy sits down, he holds his wings for a few seconds. They are constantly scanning the horizon for intruders. The Bartramia diet includes grasshoppers, crickets, weevils, beetles, moths, ants, flies, beetles, millipedes, millipedes, spiders, snails and earthworms. He also eats some grains and seeds.

Breeding

Bartramia can sometimes be found in small loose nesting colonies. Breeding season from early to late summer, Nests are located on the ground in dense grass. The female lays 4 eggs. Both parents watch after being young and can perform distraction displays to lure predators from nests or young birds.

Conservation

The numbers of these birds increased. Forests were cleared at the beginning of the 19th century, but fell sharply at the end of the 19th century due to hunting. They are currently regularly present in the Midwest of North America, but populations are scattered in the East.

The loss of prairie habitat is a concern. In addition, livestock grazing was discovered to reduce the number of nests in the field. Controlled burns can benefit this species as they feed on undersized plants that are more easily detected after a fire.

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